Author Topic: Coppicing Trees for Mulch  (Read 6250 times)

Offline Algeze

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Coppicing Trees for Mulch
« on: September 24, 2014, 02:18:01 PM »
Any suggestions? I would really like a species high in calcium. I had read an article that I thought stated species such as sugar maple, black walnut, and dogwood were such flora, but going back now I can find nothing to reference this. Thanks in advance!

Offline Algeze

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Re: Coppicing Trees for Mulch
« Reply #1 on: September 24, 2014, 02:44:36 PM »
Sorry, this should have been posted elsewhere.

Offline Brad

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Re: Coppicing Trees for Mulch
« Reply #2 on: September 24, 2014, 04:09:58 PM »
I think Beyfuss documented some of that...but he might have been relating what others have found.  But as I recall, he suggested sugar maple, then tulip poplar as being the two species which dropped the most calcium in their leaves in the fall.

Offline Algeze

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Re: Coppicing Trees for Mulch
« Reply #3 on: September 25, 2014, 04:25:43 PM »
Thanks Brad, with a name I can cross reference at least. I do believe that that is the right article, tulip poplars were at the top of said list I remember. That list could also differ greatly based on geography. The issues seem to be acid rain killing calcium levels and this agrestis earthworm eating all the ground litter (which I presume is where a good bit of our calcium comes from). So that said, my options right now (still in planning stage) are trees with high calcium (I can't find a good reference for this, anywhere), black locust for rot resistance, or black walnut for agrestis resistance. In my mind mulch will make all the difference in the world to my operation. Has anyone ever introduced predators to their land? I'm thinking of the land planarian who's entire diet consists of earthworms.

Offline Algeze

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Re: Coppicing Trees for Mulch
« Reply #4 on: September 26, 2014, 09:48:45 AM »
I just talked to a local nursery, they were unable to answer my calcium question. However they said that using wood mulch would support fungi, and that if what I was growing was herbaceous (ginseng) I would want to support bacteria by using grass clippings etc. My knowledge base here needs improvement, but what should I aim for? I would rather do a little planning now before I'm dependent on whichever route I choose.


Offline Algeze

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Re: Coppicing Trees for Mulch
« Reply #5 on: September 26, 2014, 03:39:57 PM »
So, bacteria and fungi make my head spin.. I have still found nothing on particular flora high in calcium (other than kale..) But I did find that calcium levels were significantly higher in tree tops/ foliage. The peice of land I have to grow on is 30 acres of almost northern hardwood. Deer populations are massive and the under story is non existent,

Offline Algeze

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Re: Coppicing Trees for Mulch
« Reply #6 on: September 26, 2014, 03:47:10 PM »
My first step is to install a deer fence, I've chosen to try a monofilament set up at less than a dollar a foot. It would seem to me at this point, I would almost be better off ignoring mulch and coppice. Rather I should focus on growing as many vegetative layers as I can above my plots. In other words if I get my forest healthy I should grow good ginseng.

Offline Algeze

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Re: Coppicing Trees for Mulch
« Reply #7 on: September 26, 2014, 04:28:27 PM »
Eric Burkhart is doing a webinar in December. Here's the link I found,

Offline Algeze

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Re: Coppicing Trees for Mulch
« Reply #8 on: September 26, 2014, 04:29:00 PM »

Offline Brad

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Re: Coppicing Trees for Mulch
« Reply #9 on: September 26, 2014, 04:41:59 PM »
Eric knows his stuff.

Massive deer populations means massive problems for ginseng.  McGraw had part in a study which suggested that deer are predators of ginseng to the point that they can do more damage than over harvesting or poaching.  Ginseng seed doesn't not survive a trip through a deer.

I've had good luck with electric fencing run with a Parmak 12 charger.  I got nearly a whole season from one battery with that set up.  The key is not to keep deer out (nearly impossible and very expensive)...but rather train them into understanding that they do not want to go near your operation (aggravating and time consuming with some costs also).  I always left a folded up chunk of tin foil over a hot wire with peanut butter between the folds wherever a deer trail intersected the fence.  That worked particularly well in convincing them they did not want to get near my fence even though they could easily jump over it.

Offline priorservice

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Re: Coppicing Trees for Mulch
« Reply #10 on: March 11, 2015, 09:34:22 AM »
A soil test can tell you a lot of what you need. Cornell will do it for small fee. Leave crop type blank and add ginseng in and they will do calcium test As well.
only take top inch or two of soil as that is what feeds wild sim. If you have sugar maple and black mulch type top of soil column you should be good to go. contact Bob beyfus for the soil test future he can help a ton.

Offline JWforestSeng

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  • NW Forest Grown Ginseng. Voice Mail 800-566-2823
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I'm Experimenting w NW Forest Grown Ginseng. Know anyone else in my area?